Kematian dan Tujuan kita hidup di dunia

Untuk apakah dan kenapa kita hidup di dunia ini?\r\nLahir, menyusui, belajar merangkak, memakan makanan padat, mencoba berkata, belajar berjalan…..\r\nPlay Group, TK, SD, SMP, SMA, Kuliah dan kerja…………….\r\nBagi yang ga beruntung mungkin TK, SD dan kerja……..\r\nKerja kemudian menikah, dan akhirnya memiliki anak……….\r\nBagi yang beruntung, mungkin bisa mengumpulkan kekayaan, untuk akhirnya disibukkan dan dikuatirkan oleh kekayaan itu sendiri sampai akhirnya tiba-tiba dalam sekejap karena usia dah tua, kematian datang menjemput dan akhirnya mati……\r\n\r\nBagi yang kurang beruntung, dan tak bisa mengumpulkan kekayaan, bekerja setengah mati dan dikuatirkan oleh kemiskinannya sendiri sampai akhirnya ketika badan dah sakit, kematian tiba-tiba datang menjemput tanpa ada pertanda sama sekali dan akhirnya mati………….\r\n\r\nDari semua siklus di atas, yang saya masih tidak mengerti adalah:\r\nUNTUK APAKAH KITA HIDUP DI DUNIA INI?\r\n \r\nTujuan tertinggi dari segala bentuk kehidupan adalah menyadari Keadaan Tanpa Kematian (Deathless). \r\n\r\nMaksudnya apa, Mr. Funda? Trims.\r\n\r\nmungkin ini bacaan yang cocok buat bung nokia … smile\r\n\r\nsaya sendiri suka baca artikel ini kalau udah mulai lupa diri … ini ceramah yang powerful tentang kematian oleh seorang bhikku Australia (Ajahn Brahm, yang sempat hidup di hutan bertahun2 di bawah bimbingan gurunya Luang Por Chah).\r\n\r\n===============\r\n\r\nI KNOW, BUT I DON''T KNOW: THE CONTEMPLATION OF DEATH\r\n\r\nA Talk given by Ajahn Brahmavamso to the monks at Bodhinyana Monastery on 20th December 2000.\r\n\r\nSabbe sattā maranti ca marimsu ca marissare,Tath''evāham marissāmi, n''atthi me ettha samsayo.\r\n\r\nMany of you will recall that gatha, which I chanted in Pāli at the beginning of this talk. It means, ‘'All beings will die, they are of the nature to die, and I too will also die, of that I have no doubt’'. It''s one of those beautiful chants which we have in Buddhism. It relates to the fact that every one of us will die. I will use this contemplation of death for today''s Dhamma talk.\r\n\r\nIn particular, this afternoon, I was thinking about the block of land, which we are purchasing opposite our monastery. I thought what a wonderful thing it would be if we could use some of that land as a Buddhist crematorium. The monks can go there in the evening and just contemplate death, next to, or even inside, the crematorium. Contemplation of death is part of our tradition.\r\n\r\nThe Illusion of Life\r\n\r\nI told the lay people, who are soon going to accompany me to India and then to the North East of Thailand, to Wat Pah Nanachat, the monastery where I spent so many years, that if they are lucky, there''s a good chance that they might see a Buddhist funeral. There the body of the person who has died is not sanitised by embalmers. It''s just put into a very simple coffin so that everyone can go and look at, and even touch, the person who has died. It is then burnt out in the open. The very cheap wood of the coffin quickly burns away to reveal the body. The body burns away part by part, bit by bit, and you can see the members of the body come apart from each other. You can see the skull pop and explode, and all the other parts of the body eventually just being burnt away. After many hours, all that''s left are the bones. To be able to see death in the raw is a marvellous privilege in ones life. By sanitising death we are preserving the illusion of life.\r\n\r\nThe illusion is that life will go on forever. The whole purpose of life is just the seeking of pleasures and amusements, and the accumulation of wealth. In the perspective of death, all of those foolish things, which we do in life, appear so obviously stupid. We see them as things that are completely worthless.\r\n\r\nWe heard recently of a couple of monks who disrobed. If only they could have gone to a funeral, and been able to watch a body being burnt, they might have been able to see themselves in those flames. That will surely happen to them one day. All of the searching: for sensory pleasures, for having relationships, getting married, having houses, accumulating wealth and cars, having experiences, going up the Amazon, or trekking in the Himalayas; what does all that mean in the face of death?\r\n\r\nAsoka''s Brother\r\n\r\nOne of my favourite anecdotes on death is the story of Asoka''s brother. Asoka was the Indian Emperor who became a Buddhist. Asoka had a brother, named V´tasoka, who seemed completely unspiritual, and was into sensory pleasures. Being the brother of the Emperor afforded him many opportunities to indulge in them. In order to lead his brother into understanding the Dhamma, Asoka set a trap for him.\r\n\r\nAs I re-tell the story, with some literary licence, the Emperor was in his bath while his robes and insignia were laid outside. Asoka had arranged for some of his close advisers to be walking with his brother and, as if by accident, to come through the bath house. Pointing out the Emperors robes just lying on the bench, the advisers said to Asoka''s brother, ‘'Why not try these on for size? Who knows? One day when your brother dies, you will probably be Emperor. Try them on. Go on, it will be alright’'. At first the brother would not do it. He knew that it was illegal to do so. But in the end his pride got the better of him. Who wouldn''t like to dress up in the Emperor''s clothes? It was all pre-planned, and so as soon as he was dressed in the Emperor''s clothes, the Emperor Asoka came out of the bathhouse and caught him!\r\n\r\nThe Emperor asked: ‘'What are you doing? Are you usurping the throne? Are you a traitor?’' Because this was a crime, the Emperor said, ‘'Even though you are my brother, I have to administer the law impartially. The penalty for this is death.’'\r\n\r\nDespite his own brother''s desperate pleas for mercy, the Emperor insisted on maintaining the law and having his unfortunate brother killed. However, he added, ‘'Seeing you are my brother, and you would like to be Emperor so much, for the next seven days you can enjoy all the pleasures of an Emperor. But you will have none of the responsibilities. You can enjoy my harem. You can have whatever you want to eat. And whatever entertainment I enjoy, you can enjoy as well. The pleasures of the Emperor are yours for seven days. But after seven days, you will be executed’'. Then the Emperor left.\r\n\r\nAfter seven days, the Emperor Asoka summoned his brother to the place of execution. The Emperor asked him, ‘'Did you enjoy the harem, all those beautiful girls? Did you enjoy the best food from my kitchens? Did you enjoy my musicians and other entertainers?’' The brother looked down at the ground, his shoulders drooping and said, ‘'Could I enjoy all that? I couldn’'t even enjoy one night''s sleep. How can you enjoy anything when you know that you are soon to be executed?''\r\n\r\nThe Emperor smiled and said, ‘'Now you may understand!’'\r\n\r\nWhether its seven days, seven months, seven years or seventy years, how can you enjoy the pleasures of the senses, such as: sex, sport, movies, travelling or accumulating possessions? How can you enjoy all that when you know that you are going to be executed? Whether it''s seven days, seven months, seven years or seventy years, soon you are all going to be dead.\r\n\r\nThrough this experience, the brother learnt much of the Dhamma. He became a devout Buddhist from that time on and kept the precepts. His insight into the meaning of death made very clear that which is important in life.\r\n\r\nI Know, but I Don''t Know\r\n\r\nThe Buddha wanted his monks to contemplate their death in the same way. It is as if you are all going to be executed! Life is a death sentence! We are all on death row in this monastery, but we don''t know how the execution is going to take place, and we don''t know exactly when. A weaver''s daughter once responded to a series of questions from the Buddha, by answering, ‘'I know, but I don’'t know''. The Buddha smiled and acknowledged her wisdom. Someone asked her afterwards, ‘'What do you mean by you know, but you don’'t know?'', and she replied that she knew that she would die, but didn''t know when she would die (Dhp-a, XIII. 7).\r\n\r\nInsight into death rearranges your priorities. So what is important for you? You are soon going to die, and after your death you are going to be carrying the kamma of this life into your future lives.\r\n\r\nAny person who doesn''t believe in rebirth is going to get a great shock when it happens. It''s true. Reincarnation is real. You will soon experience this for yourselves! Embracing the reality of your death and subsequent rebirth gives you a different perspective on how to live your life.\r\n\r\nAs monks, we have the ten reflections for one who has gone forth. The tenth is a reflection on our deathbed. (An X, 4smile It is traditional to ask a monk on his deathbed, ‘'What states of Jhānas have you achieved? What stages of liberation, or Enlightenment have you reached?’'\r\n\r\nGood monks do not tell even their friends about such attainments, unless they are close to death. That''s why it is an old tradition to ask monks that question only on their deathbeds. I encourage you to do the same. Ask your fellow monks when they are near death, ‘'What have you achieved? What have you realized?’' Such questioning brings back a sense of urgency to what we are doing in this monastery. We don''t want to live for years and years in this or other monasteries, going from place to place in the Buddhist monastic world, and then find at the end of our life that we are no further along the Path to Liberation than when we started. We don''t want to find that we haven''t made proper use of this wonderful opportunity to experience a Jhāna, or to at least achieve Stream Winning. I say this because if you don''t realize these things in your life as a monk, after death who knows what might happen?\r\n\r\nThrowing Up a Stick\r\n\r\nIn one of the stories from the suttas, the Buddha said that your future rebirth is so very uncertain. It''s like throwing a stick into the air. You can''t be sure which end it is going to fall on. In the same way, you can''t be certain after death if you will fall into the fortunate realms or the unfortunate realms! (Sn 15. 9)\r\n\r\nThat impressed me. But it also scared me, when I first read it. We all think that if we make lots and lots of good kamma then we are certain of a happy rebirth. And you do make good kamma, because you are all good monks. You keep the precepts very well. The novices are good, they are great novices. Even the visitors who come here are all very high minded. They are pure minded beings for the most part. As beings in the world go, you are the cream. However, even if you live a very good life, even if you are a monk for many years in this life, if you don''t penetrate to Stream Winning then you can''t be certain what rebirth is going to follow!\r\n\r\nAll that you can achieve by making lots of good kamma is to make one end of the ‘'stick’' heavier. Then the chances are it will fall on the heavy end, and your good kamma will ripen into a beautiful rebirth. But the sutta very clearly says that even though one end is heavy, every now and again that stick will land on the lighter end. So, even if you make lots of good kamma, the bad kamma that you have performed, either in this life or in previous lives, is still there. Because of that bad kamma, which hasn''t been used up yet, there is always the chance of being reborn in a very unfortunate rebirth.\r\n\r\nThat is the fear of samsāra. It''s not just old age, sickness and death in this life. Its also, old age sickness and death in future lives, in less pleasant lives than the one you are in now. Even though you may be a good monk, a good novice, or a good lay person, it''s still uncertain what your rebirth is going to be. This fact makes you put forth more effort on your spiritual path. It makes you more diligent. Where does diligence come from? Where does that effort come from? It only comes when you see how dangerous rebirth is.\r\n\r\nLetting Go\r\n\r\nI gave a talk last night to lay people about the meditation on letting go, of just doing nothing. To be able to do nothing, you have to be able to understand that doing nothing is important. That letting go within the mind is valuable. Just sitting down meditating is a matter of life and death, more important than any other business. Meditation is more important than our finances, our relationships, our children, our vehicles, or our possessions. It is more important even than going out and working for the community. It''s more important than everything else because it''s the only way to make an end of suffering.\r\n\r\nAccumulating wealth, what meaning has that? It all disappears when you die. Indulging in the pleasures of life, even if you manage to get them in great amounts, usually just bring lots of frustrations. If you do get lots and lots of pleasure in this life, so what! It always disappears in the pain and fog of old age. One of the things that you notice in life, as you get older, is that most of the pleasures in life occur early on and the pain of life is what you''re mostly left with at the end. Knowing this, seeing the dangers in life, why does anybody get involved in all this wasting of time?\r\n\r\nWe can go around teaching others, or writing books for others, and spreading the Dhamma, but is that really our duty in this life? So many people are spreading the Dhamma, but so few people are realising the Dhamma. Sometimes you wonder what we are spreading anyway. If you don''t realise the Dhamma for yourself, you run the risk of spreading muck around. And people will take up that muck, thinking that it''s Dhamma. Sometimes people give teachings on muck, and everyone thinks how Enlightened they are; but it''s all muck Dhamma. It''s not real Dhamma. They haven''t realised the Dhamma for themselves. That''s a great shame for this world. We don''t really need people spreading Dhamma as much as we need more people realising that Dhamma.\r\n\r\nThe Purpose of Life\r\n\r\nWhen you start reflecting on death, everything starts to become so clear. You realize how foolish you have been. During my life I have wasted so much time, when I really didn''t have time to waste. When I look back on my early years as a monk, I did waste too much time. But fortunately I had enough good meditation as well. Now as a forty-nine year old monk I can''t afford to waste any more time.\r\n\r\nI look at all the opportunities young monks have, and sometimes, well, they don''t make good use of those opportunities. They don''t hang around in their huts, or on their walking paths for hour after hour, walking and sitting, walking and sitting. They don''t use the time in between walking and sitting to study the suttas, and to contemplate their meaning. If you are wasting time, isn''t that a shame!\r\n\r\nHere we have one of the best monasteries in the world and some of the best facilities. Of all the monasteries that I have been to, this is one of the best. It''s as good as it gets. Sometimes, just living in a forest takes so much effort. In the forest monasteries that I knew in Thailand, you had to spend so much of the day just walking the long distance for the alms round, and then working in the monastery in the afternoon. The time for seclusion to meditate was very limited.\r\n\r\nSo, reflect on the following: ‘'I don’'t know how long I''ll have these facilities. I don''t know how long I''ll be healthy enough to do this''. There are enough monks here with bad backs or bad knees, bad this and bad that. If you''re a healthy monk, or even a reasonably healthy one, if you can sit meditation, cross your legs and straighten your back without too much pain, you are extremely fortunate. You won''t always be like that. Use this opportunity now!\r\n\r\nIt''s not just your body that is going to die, your good health will die, your energy will die, and your opportunities will die. So reflect on death, as it says in the suttas, as if your turban was on fire. In other words, death gives precedence to the practice, and it makes the Eightfold Path the most important thing in the world. It gives the Path priority over everything else. It would be wonderful if people had that understanding of death to the degree that they embraced it all the time. It would be wonderful if they had that mindfulness, which remembers that death is always stalking you. Death can happen at any time!\r\n\r\nTherefore, what''s important to me is to develop the Eightfold Path as much as I can, as deeply as I can, so that I can experience the Jhānas. It''s important that I can experience the Paths and Fruits of this practice. It''s important that I can be free. Free first of all from the lower realms, and eventually from rebirth altogether. Otherwise death becomes very scary, even for great practitioners. They can fall so easily if they haven''t got this security from bondage, this security from all bad rebirths. We use these reflections on death to generate a sense of urgency.\r\n\r\nAs we travel the Eightfold Path, we should not use force. We don''t ‘'do’' the practice, it is something we allow to happen. We renounce all other business in our lives. I''ve often noticed that if you just allow this path to happen, it happens so beautifully, so powerfully and so effectively. The problem is we don''t allow the path to happen. We are too busy doing other things. It''s quite clear what we are supposed to be doing.\r\n\r\nWe know the section of the Eightfold Path about virtuous conduct; Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood. Everyone in this monastery, even if you are in this monastery temporarily, can tick off those three parts of the Eightfold Path. You''re fulfilling them, that is of course, as long as you are keeping the rules and the precepts of this monastery.\r\n\r\nNow as to Right Effort, (it is unfortunate that we have to translate these terms into English), as soon as you say right effort, people think of striving and struggling, and forcing and controlling, and doing. If we can somehow turn our minds to effort without doing, to a practice of letting go, then we have gained some deeper understanding about what right effort truly means. It''s the effort to let go, not the effort to add to or to get rid of, that is one of the hardest things for the Western mind to get around. Often people waste so many years and so much of their time just trying too hard.\r\n\r\nIt''s the Arahants, and the people who have great wisdom, who have no difficulty. Those of you who have studied Pāli, come across this again and again. Jhānas are easy for the wise; they are attained with no difficulty. You should reflect on how these states can be attained without difficulty? It is because those people know the path to entering the Jhānas. It is the ‘'no difficulty’' path. So don''t make it difficult! If you can let go, disentangle yourself from the past and the future, then there is no difficulty. Let the past and the future die for you, so that you''ve only got the present moment. Let all thinking die. Then there is no difficulty. What does it mean when you die to all your past? All the things you worried about, and all the concerns about the past, it''s all gone. And as for the future who knows?\r\n\r\nInto the Light\r\n\r\nThe present moment is the only thing that you ever have. When you die your body and all your concerns, are taken away from you. What were you worried about? Let it all go. Allow your thinking, thinking, thinking, to die. When a person''s dead, they are brain dead, there''s no brain activity. When a person dies, often in the first moments after death, there is that silence of the mind, before the mind made body can start to name things, and start to conceptualise about what they are experiencing. For the first few seconds or even longer, it''s a time of silence, a different type of perception. This is similar to what one can do in one''s meditation, let go of that inner chatter, allow it to die, as if you are dying. Many people when they have been close to death have had spiritual experiences. In many traditions, they have experiences of dying to the world and becoming wise afterwards. The experience which Theravāda monks of our tradition have is that when they get into Jhānas, they die to the body and become wise to the nature of the mind.\r\n\r\nThat experience of allowing every thing to disappear is so similar to the process of dying, that the reflection on dying can very easily be incorporated into the practice which leads into Jhānas. Die to the past and future. Die to the thoughts. Die to the body, and eventually die to the breath. It''s as if you take your last breath as you are meditating. In other words your body becomes as still as a corpse, you completely let go of the breathing, and go into the nimitta. It is just like that when a person dies. They go out of their body into the light that is the same as the nimitta.\r\n\r\nReally we''re talking about an amata state (a deathless state). Amata is a word that is used in Pāli. The word death, marana, is always about the death of the body. The death of the mind is called Parinibbāna, but the death of the body is always marana. The past participle of that is mata, dead or died. But do you know what really doesn''t die? If you''ve contemplated this through deep meditation, you know it is this stream of consciousness. It''s that which carries on after death. In that sense, the stream of consciousness is amata, because that is beyond the physical death. It''s that which can be reborn in the rūpa realms (material realms) or the arūpa realms (immaterial realms). However, that''s not the end of things. I think that word amata was popular in the time of the Buddha because, like most people even today, when they talked about some sort of salvation, it was very much a materialistic idea. It was the idea of going into a state of amata, of deathlessness, where they could ‘'be’' forever and ever and ever, without having to worry about death. Some sort of heaven realm, some sort of eternity realm. Perhaps the way the Buddha used the word amata was taking it from common usage and giving it a different meaning. But from experience, what doesn''t die is the stream of consciousness, the mano viññana or mind consciousness. In Jhānas you can actually know what mind consciousness really is as an experience.\r\n\r\nIn the Jhānas it is as if the body has died along with all the conceptions of the world, all feelings, everything that is concerned with the world and the body. So really the Jhānas are death-like states, in the sense that the body has gone, it has disappeared. The worlds of the past and future have gone, they have disappeared. All your possessions have gone, they have disappeared. All your thoughts have gone, they have disappeared, along with all the struggling and doing. The coming and going, has gone, they have disappeared. Can you understand me? Can you understand what the word ‘'death’' means? It means transcending this body. It is letting go of the body. The problem is of course, that most people when they die go and get born again, and then they have to die all over again. They keep on doing that because they don''t fully die to the world, they die a little bit, but they still want to experience some more.\r\n\r\nSo you have to learn how to develop the meditation of letting go, that effort which abandons all the plans and busyness, all of those little fetters, those little knots, which tie you to this worldly body. It''s fascinating to sometimes reflect on just how wisely you''ve spent your day. What''s occupied your mind today? Do a statistical analysis. How much of your mind has been occupied today with the body, or with the world, or with the monastery, or with your own affairs? And how much has been occupied with the affairs of the deathless? That will give you a good idea of why you''re not getting Enlightened. We have to be more occupied with the deathless!\r\n\r\nA Place of Simplicity\r\n\r\nI''ve been struggling for many years to try and make this monastery a place where you don''t need to worry about much. To organise it so that all of the basic human needs are provided for. Out there in the world people have to struggle so much just to survive, to have a house, and food to get by. It''s so complex out there. The whole ethos and meaning behind the monastery is to be a place of simplicity. A place where the time you spend looking after this body, feeding it, washing it, and housing it is so little, that you can devote the majority of your time to the deathless, that which lies beyond the body. However people always tend to make life more complex. They always make things more difficult: taking the body from one place to another, getting it healthy, feeding it, and washing it, or whatever else it is that we do with our bodies. There is so little time left for the mind. When we''ve developed the perception of death, and its opposite, the deathless, we can incline and spend more time on that which is beyond death. Even though you may not have experienced those states yet, in this life anyway, there is something that recognises the existence of the state of mind that is beyond the body. By just knowing that much, it''s like a whiff of scent. It is enough to show you what direction to go.\r\n\r\nRemember that all the doing, which we think is right effort, keeps us with this body, keeps us with the past and the future; so it is not the correct type of doing. It''s effort which leads to more entanglements. The effort which leads to letting go is remembering that this doesn''t belong to me. It is cāga, giving up and abandoning. That''s why this monastery can be a prison if you don''t want to be here. But if you''re completely content here, if you''re completely happy, then it''s not a prison any more. It''s contentment that frees you. Letting go is thinking that it doesn''t belong to me. I''m content with whatever''s happening. Its anālaya, or freedom from attachment. It''s the Teflon mind, nothing sticks to it, nothing can land on it, and its patinissagga, always giving up, relinquishing; going in the opposite direction to attaching. It''s actually throwing things off rather than allowing things to land on you and to ingratiate themselves with you. That''s the effort to let go. That''s the effort that leads to the transcending of death.\r\n\r\nWhen you let go of all these things, everything disappears: the body goes, the world goes, the huts go, the books go, the illnesses go, the Buddhist Society of Western Australia disappears. Everything is gone, and you realise what monastic life is all about. The holy life, at least the start of it, is all about going into the realms of the mind. And if you have got into Jhānas, an insight that comes automatically after those Jhāna states is that the stream of mind consciousness has died to the body. There has been a separation. It is just like the Christian idea of the soul leaving the body. It is the stream of consciousness that leaves the body, not physically, because these are different planes. The realm of the mind, mind space, is not something that you can measure in physical space. It is a parallel universe if you like, but that parallel universe, the mind space, is independent. It is completely unaffected, if it wants to be, by the four dimensional world of space and time.\r\n\r\nNibbāna\r\n\r\nTo know that much means that there will never be a fear of death, because you know what death is. It''s the death of the body. It''s the death of the five senses, the ending of that entire world outside. Such understanding gives you a different perspective. It is one of the greatest treasures, one of the greatest happinesses, that you have ever found. All the pleasures of the world seem to be so useless, so trivial and petty. You really wonder why you''ve been messing around: with relationships, with sex, with getting married, with accumulating wealth or keeping wealth. What a foolish thing to do spending your life running around, backwards and forwards, when you could have these beautiful blissful states of mind! That''s why I''ve always encouraged people by hook or by crook, somehow or other, to get a taste of those states. One taste will change your life and give you a different perspective. Even though it may have been only one taste many years ago, you can''t forget that. You can''t ignore it because it''s a powerful transforming experience. It gives you an idea an experience of what is possible, what it means to let go of the kāma loka, the world of the body, the world of, birth, old age sickness and death.\r\n\r\nWhen you look at the world of the mind, you see that the mind doesn''t get old, and it needn''t get sick. The mind really only gets sick if you let it get sick. That''s why the Buddha said that even though the body is sick, the mind does not need to be sick. (Sn III, 1) So even though the body gets sick, don''t let the mind get sick too. The stream of consciousness can be completely above that. If you can do just that much and completely let go of the world of the body, then you will at least be an Anāgāmi, a Non Returner. When you die you will go up to the realm of the mind, play around there for a few aeons and from there, Nibbāna. I shouldn''t really say this, but it''s not a bad way of exiting from samsāra. The Buddha would quite rightly criticise me for advocating any type of existence, even in the Anāgāmi realms. The Buddha says it''s just not worth it, it''s best to Nibbāna as soon as you can.\r\n\r\nNibbāna is like another level of death. It is the end of the mind. Ordinary death is the death of things relating to the body, the death of this world, the losing of all your possessions, and separation from what you loved. Old age and sickness, they''re just the messengers of death, the precursors, just the signs that death is coming. ‘'Death is coming!’' It''s just like the first bills you get, the first reminders, saying if you don''t pay within a few days you are going to be taken to court. They''re the warning notices, and then suddenly it just comes.\r\n\r\nOld age and sickness, they are all part of death. It''s amazing how people can completely neglect and deny those warning signs. They get old, old, old and they think they''re still going to live for a long time, they get sick, sick, sick and they think they are always going to get better. These are the warning signs that: ‘'Death is coming. Death is coming. Death is coming.’' If you''ve got a bad back today, that''s a warning sign that death is coming. If you have a headache, or stomach ache, if you feel a bit low in energy or even if you''ve just had a cold, that''s death coming. Always remember that. These symptoms are like death knocking on the door, you may not be quite ready yet, but it doesn''t really matter. Death will just break in, like a home invader, and drag you away, whether you are ready or not.\r\n\r\nSummary and Conclusion\r\n\r\nSo it''s good to be ready. You do that by preparing to let go of this world. This world is useful in as much as it provides a means for the holy life to be lived. This body is useful in that it provides a vehicle for you to be able sit down and meditate, and gain the Jhānas, and the consequent insight the enables one to leave samsāra. That''s the whole purpose of the body, the purpose of the senses, and the purpose of this life. However people who don''t know the purpose of life, the meaning of life, just waste their time and do foolish things. They go around and around, like children on a merry-go-round, thinking that it''s so good, so wonderful and so enjoyable. Doing the reflection on death again and again, allows you to let go of a lot of the useless pursuits in your life.\r\n\r\nEven those of you who are senior monks in this monastery, what do you really want to achieve? You might die tonight. What''s important to you? Is it finishing off that letter, or is it meditating and getting into Jhāna. You may only have another week or two, who knows? What''s really important to you? Just before your death do you want to look back and be able to say: ‘'I’'ve used this life properly? At least I''ve had a Jhāna, (or even better) I''ve got Magga Phala, the Fruit of the Path.'' Then you can die at ease, and you''ve used this life as it''s supposed to be used. You''ve made the best of your opportunities. So be diligent. Know the Path, and know what works!\r\n\r\nMake that effort, which is a letting go. Remember, ‘'this doesn’'t belong to me''. The body doesn''t belong to me. This monastery doesn''t belong to me. My letters doesn''t belong to me. My family doesn''t belong to me. My past, my history, don''t belong to me, and neither does my future. You own nothing in this world. Death teaches how little you really own. The body belongs to nature. The past belongs to fantasy. The future belongs to stupidity. You own nothing. All your thoughts belong to your conditioning. You own nothing, nothing, nothing. My robes just belong to the earth. All the possessions in my hut belong to the earth as well. All that is mine will one day go to the rubbish dump. It will be incinerated.\r\n\r\nI thought when I first came here, that I would build this monastery strong so that it would last for hundreds and thousands of years. And already you can see it is falling apart. Cracks are appearing in the walls of your huts. The monk who told me he saw cracks appearing in the wall of his hut should look at his own body and see the cracks right down his own body. We''re falling apart. We''re crumbling. Soon we''ll be dust like that hut.\r\n\r\nWhen we look at things in this way, we get everything into perspective. The crack in the wall of your hut is showing you death. You''re grateful to the harbinger of death for encouraging you to let go and develop the deep meditations. You are dying to the body, dying to world, and dying to the defilements that keep you in that world. You are liberating yourself, owning nothing, and being content with owning nothing. When you''re content, you need nothing. When you''re content you''re dead to desires. When people die you write on their gravestone, ‘'Rest in Peace’'. When you''re in Jhānas you are resting in peace, and Nibbāna is the only true peace.\r\n\r\nThese are some reflections about death, reflections about Nibbāna, reflections about the body, the world and the mind. So please be diligent, life is fading away so fast.\r\n\r\n Adapted from the Asokāvadāna, John S Strong: New Delhi, Motilal Banasidass, 1989.\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n The Ten Reflections of a Monk: (AN10, 4smile\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n1. I have entered a life beyond caste or class.\r\n\r\n2. My life is dependent on the generosity of others.\r\n\r\n3. My conduct must be different from that of a lay person.\r\n\r\n4. Do I reproach myself in regard to virtue?\r\n\r\n5. Do my wise fellow monks reproach me in regard to virtue?\r\n\r\n6. I must be separated and parted from all that is dear and beloved to me.\r\n\r\n7. I am the owner of my actions, heir to my actions …\r\n\r\n8. How do I spend my days and nights?\r\n\r\n9. Do I delight in solitude?\r\n\r\n10. If I am questioned about my attainments by my fellow monks at the time of my death shall I be dismayed?\r\n\r\n \r\n\r\n The Eightfold Path consists of:\r\n\r\n(Wisdom)\r\n\r\n1. Right View or Understanding.\r\n\r\n2. Right Thoughts or Intentions.\r\n\r\n(Morality)\r\n\r\n3. Right Speech.\r\n\r\n4. Right Action.\r\n\r\n5. Right Livelihood.\r\n\r\n(Mind Development)\r\n\r\n6. Right Effort.\r\n\r\n7. Right Mindfulness.\r\n\r\n8. Right Concentration = Jhāna
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thanks bro…nice… :peace:
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Yup, I catch the point…… Bukankah surga adalah ketika kita mengalami suka cita dan neraka adalah ketika kita mengalami duka cita? anda sangat bijaksana. heaven is impermanent, hell is impermanent. both can be experienced HERE AND NOW. Happiness is heaven Suffering is hell Awareness here and now transcend heaven and hell. Now is the knowing (awareness moment), past is gone, future hasn''t come. I have experienced so many heavens and hells in this life … smile) But they are just as such … come and go … only awareness stays … :peace:
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Well,Mr. Funda, terima kasih atas waktu anda yang telah anda curahkan dalam membantu saya mencari jawaban atas pertanyaan saya…….. Menarik sekali apa yang telah anda utarakan. Kita diberi kesempatan yang sangat jarang terlahir sebagai manusia untuk berlatih melenyapkan kamma, , tapi rata-rata dari kita menyia-nyiakan kesempatan yang sangat berharga ini………….. Hidup adalah persiapan untuk belajar terus menerus menghadapi masalah yang tidak bisa terelakkan dan menimpa siapapun yaitu kematian….. Dan kematian untuk agar tidak terlahirkan kembali, itulah ajaran Buddha. Dari yang anda utarakan pula, saya tertarik dengan right concentration. Gimana untuk melatih right concentration ( jhana) ini? Anda pernah berlatih tidak? Apakah yang telah anda dapatkan dari perlatihan right concentration ini? Adakah jalan lain jika kita tidak memungkinkan untuk menjadi Bhikkhu tapi kita tetap ingin melenyapkan lingkaran roda hidup mati ini? Mungkinkah ? Bukankah jika kita membiarkan semuanya berlalu, begitu gampang melepas segalanya karena kita berpikir bahwa semuanya toh adalah tidak kekal, bukankah kemajuan manusia akan berhenti? Atas jawaban anda, banyak terima kasih saya ucapkan.
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Well,Mr. Funda, terima kasih atas waktu anda yang telah anda curahkan dalam membantu saya mencari jawaban atas pertanyaan saya…….. Menarik sekali apa yang telah anda utarakan. Kita diberi kesempatan yang sangat jarang terlahir sebagai manusia untuk berlatih melenyapkan kamma, , tapi rata-rata dari kita menyia-nyiakan kesempatan yang sangat berharga ini………….. Hidup adalah persiapan untuk belajar terus menerus menghadapi masalah yang tidak bisa terelakkan dan menimpa siapapun yaitu kematian….. Dan kematian untuk agar tidak terlahirkan kembali, itulah ajaran Buddha. Dari yang anda utarakan pula, saya tertarik dengan right concentration. Gimana untuk melatih right concentration ( jhana) ini? Anda pernah berlatih tidak? Apakah yang telah anda dapatkan dari perlatihan right concentration ini? Adakah jalan lain jika kita tidak memungkinkan untuk menjadi Bhikkhu tapi kita tetap ingin melenyapkan lingkaran roda hidup mati ini? Mungkinkah ? Bukankah jika kita membiarkan semuanya berlalu, begitu gampang melepas segalanya karena kita berpikir bahwa semuanya toh adalah tidak kekal, bukankah kemajuan manusia akan berhenti? Atas jawaban anda, banyak terima kasih saya ucapkan. Bung nokia, no problem. Mengenai kelahiran sebagai manusia, memang sangat langka. Minimal harus banyak berbuat baik agar tidak jatuh ke alam menderita. Berbuat baik seperti dana juga adalah batu loncatan untuk praktek2 yang lebih tinggi. Mengenai praktek meditasi (samadhi), ada baiknya anda mencari guru yang skilful untuk membimbing anda. Saya sendiri pernah ikut latihan meditasi, tapi pengalaman saya terbatas. Terus terang kehidupan sebagai umat awam, dengan kesibukan bisnis, membuat praktek meditasi saya menjadi agak terbatas. Kedamaian yang didapat dari meditasi juga tidak sedalam kedamaian yang dicapai para bhikku, yaitu kedamaian Jhana, atau bahkan kedamaian Penembusan Nibbana. Tidak gampang untuk mencapai tingkatan Jhana. Dari cerita para bhikku (e.g. Ajahn Brahm), biasanya dibutuhkan meditasi yang lama dan konsisten selama bertahun tahun, serta pengendalian indera yang tinggi untuk itu. Itulah salah satu tujuan vihara hutan didirikan, untuk menciptakan situasi yang kondusif untuk meditasi. Nanti saya posting instruksi meditasi yang diajarkan Luang Por Chah atau artikel lainnya. Bisa dipraktekkan di rumah (kalau bisa di kamar pribadi) atau bisa juga ikut retreat. Informasi retreat biasanya sering ditempel di bulletin board di vihara2 seperti Vihara Dhammacakka di Sunter, Vihara BuddhaSasana di Kelapa Gading, etc.
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On Meditation1 (By Ajahn Chah) To calm the mind means to find the right balance. If you try to force your mind too much it goes too far; if you don''t try enough it doesn''t get there, it misses the point of balance. Normally the mind isn''t still, it''s moving all the time. We must strengthen the mind. Making the mind strong and making the body strong are not the same. To make the body strong we have to exercise it, to push it, in order to make it strong, but to make the mind strong means to make it peaceful, not to go thinking of this and that. For most of us the mind has never been peaceful, it has never had the energy of samādhi2, so we must establish it within a boundary. We sit in meditation, staying with the ‘'one who knows’'. If we force our breath to be too long or too short, we''re not balanced, the mind won''t become peaceful. It''s like when we first start to use a pedal sewing machine. At first we just practise pedalling the machine to get our coordination right, before we actually sew anything. Following the breath is similar. We don''t get concerned over how long or short, weak or strong it is, we just note it. We simply let it be, following the natural breathing. When it''s balanced, we take the breathing as our meditation object. When we breathe in, the beginning of the breath is at the nose-tip, the middle of the breath at the chest and the end of the breath at the abdomen. This is the path of the breath. When we breathe out, the beginning of the breath is at the abdomen, the middle at the chest and the end at the nose-tip. Simply take note of this path of the breath at the nosetip, the chest and the abdomen, then at the abdomen, the chest and the tip of the nose. We take note of these three points in order to make the mind firm, to limit mental activity so that mindfulness and self-awareness can easily arise. When our attention settles on these three points, we can let them go and note the in and out breathing, concentrating solely at the nose-tip or the upper lip, where the air passes on its in and out passage. We don''t have to follow the breath, just to establish mindfulness in front of us at the nose-tip, and note the breath at this one point - entering, leaving, entering, leaving. There''s no need to think of anything special, just concentrate on this simple task for now, having continuous presence of mind. There''s nothing more to do, just breathing in and out. Soon the mind becomes peaceful, the breath refined. The mind and body become light. This is the right state for the work of meditation. When sitting in meditation the mind becomes refined, but whatever state it''s in we should try to be aware of it, to know it. Mental activity is there together with tranquillity. There is vitakka. Vitakka is the action of bringing the mind to the theme of contemplation. If there is not much mindfulness, there will be not much vitakka. Then vicāra, the contemplation around that theme, follows. Various weak mental impressions may arise from time to time but our self-awareness is the important thing-whatever may be happening we know it continuously. As we go deeper we are constantly aware of the state of our meditation, knowing whether or not the mind is firmly established. Thus, both concentration and awareness are present. To have a peaceful mind does not mean that there''s nothing happening, mental impressions do arise. For instance, when we talk about the first level of absorption, we say it has five factors. Along with vitakka and vicāra, pīti (rapture) arises with the theme of contemplation and then sukha (happiness). These four things all lie together in the mind established in tranquillity. They are as one state. The fifth factor is ekaggatā or one-pointedness. You may wonder how there can be one-pointedness when there are all these other factors as well. This is because they all become unified on that foundation of tranquillity. Together they are called a state of samādhi. They are not everyday states of mind, they are factors of absorption. There are these five characteristics, but they do not disturb the basic tranquillity. There is vitakka, but it does not disturb the mind; vicāra, rapture and happiness arise but do not disturb the mind. The mind is therefore as one with these factors. The first level of absorption is like this. We don''t have to call it first jhāna, second jhāna, third jhāna3 and so on, let''s just call it ‘'a peaceful mind’'. As the mind becomes progressively calmer it will dispense with vitakka and vicāra, leaving only rapture and happiness. Why does the mind discard vitakka and vicāra? This is because, as the mind becomes more refined, the activities of vitakka and vicāra are too coarse to remain. At this stage, as the mind leaves off vitakka and vicāra, feelings of great rapture can arise, tears may gush out. But as the samādhi deepens rapture, too, is discarded, leaving only happiness and one-pointedness, until finally even happiness goes and the mind reaches its greatest refinement. There are only equanimity and one-pointedness, all else has been left behind. The mind stands unmoving Once the mind is peaceful this can happen. You don''t have to think a lot about it, it just happens by itself when the causal factors are ripe. This is called the energy of a peaceful mind. In this state the mind is not drowsy; the five hindrances, sense desire, aversion, restlessness, dullness and doubt, have all fled. But if mental energy is still not strong and mindfulness weak, there will occasionally arise intruding mental impressions. The mind is peaceful but it''s as if there''s a ‘'cloudiness’' within the calm. It''s not a normal sort of drowsiness though, some impressions will manifest - maybe we''ll hear a sound or see a dog or something. It''s not really clear but it''s not a dream either. This is because these five factors have become unbalanced and weak. The mind tends to play tricks within these levels of tranquillity. ‘'Imagery’' will sometimes arise when the mind is in this state, through any of the senses, and the meditator may not be able to tell exactly what is happening. ‘'’'Am I sleeping? No. Is it a dream? No, it''s not a dream…'''' These impressions arise from a middling sort of tranquillity; but if the mind is truly calm and clear we don''t doubt the various mental impressions or imagery which arise. Questions like, ‘'’'Did I drift off then? Was I sleeping? Did I get lost?…'''' don''t arise, for they are characteristics of a mind which is still doubting. ‘'’'Am I asleep or awake?''''… Here, the mind is fuzzy. This is the mind getting lost in its moods. It''s like the moon going behind a cloud. You can still see the moon but the clouds covering it render it hazy. It''s not like the moon which has emerged from behind the clouds clear, sharp and bright. When the mind is peaceful and established firmly in mindfulness and self-awareness, there will be no doubt concerning the various phenomena which we encounter. The mind will truly be beyond the hindrances. We will clearly know everything which arises in the mind as it is. We do not doubt because the mind is clear and bright. The mind which reaches samādhi is like this Some people find it hard to enter samādhi because they don''t have the right tendencies. There is samādhi, but it''s not strong or firm. However, one can attain peace through the use of wisdom, through contemplating and seeing the truth of things, solving problems that way. This is using wisdom rather than the power of samādhi. To attain calm in practice, it''s not necessary to be sitting in meditation, for instance. Just ask yourself, ‘'’'Eh, what is that?… ‘'’' and solve your problem right there! A person with wisdom is like this. Perhaps he can''t really attain high levels of samādhi, although there must be some, just enough to cultivate wisdom. It''s like the difference between farming rice and farming corn. One can depend on rice more than corn for one''s livelihood. Our practice can be like this, we depend more on wisdom to solve problems. When we see the truth, peace arises. The two ways are not the same. Some people have insight and are strong in wisdom but do not have much samādhi. When they sit in meditation they aren''t very peaceful. They tend to think a lot, contemplating this and that, until eventually they contemplate happiness and suffering and see the truth of them. Some incline more towards this than samādhi. Whether standing, walking, sitting or lying, enlightenment of the Dhamma can take place. Through seeing, through relinquishing, they attain peace. They attain peace through knowing the truth, through going beyond doubt, because they have seen it for themselves. Other people have only little wisdom but their samādhi is very strong. They can enter very deep samādhi quickly, but not having much wisdom, they cannot catch their defilements, they don''t know them. They can''t solve their problems. But regardless of whichever approach we use, we must do away with wrong thinking, leaving only right view. We must get rid of confusion, leaving only peace. Either way we end up at the same place. There are these two sides to practice, but these two things, calm and insight, go together. We can''t do away with either of them. They must go together. That which ‘'looks over’' the various factors which arise in meditation is sati, mindfulness. This sati is a condition which, through practice, can help other factors to arise. Sati is life. Whenever we don''t have sati, when we are heedless, it''s as if we are dead. If we have no sati, then our speech and actions have no meaning. Sati is simply recollection. It''s a cause for the arising of self-awareness and wisdom. Whatever virtues we have cultivated are imperfect if lacking in sati. Sati is that which watches over us while standing, walking, sitting and lying. Even when we are no longer in samādhi, sati should be present throughout. Whatever we do we take care. A sense of shame4 will arise. We will feel ashamed about the things we do which aren''t correct. As shame increases, our collectedness will increase as well. When collectedness increases, heedlessness will disappear. Even if we don''t sit in meditation, these factors will be present in the mind. And this arises because of cultivating sati. Develop sati! This is the quality which looks over the work we are doing in the present. It has real value. We should know ourselves at all times. If we know ourselves like this, right will distinguish itself from wrong, the path will become clear, and cause for all shame will dissolve. Wisdom will arise. We can bring the practice all together as morality, concentration and wisdom. To be collected, to be controlled, this is morality. The firm establishing of the mind within that control is concentration. Complete, overall knowledge within the activity in which we are engaged is wisdom. The practice in brief is just morality, concentration and wisdom, or in other words, the path. There is no other way.
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Meditation: The Heart of Buddhism Ajahn Brahmavamso This is an edited version of a talk given by Ajahn Brahmavamso at the Buddhist Society of Western Australia on the 4th February 2000. NAMO TASSA BHAGAVATO ARAHATO SAMMASAMBUDDHASSA I want to talk in depth today about the nature of Buddhism. Very often I read in newspapers and books some strange things that are presented as Buddhism. So here, I will point out the heart of the real Buddhist teaching, not as a theory but as an experience. What is Not The Heart of Buddhism. Psychotherapy. I know that some people still think Buddhism is some form of psychotherapy, some way of applying wise attitudes or skilful means in order to live more at peace in this world. Indeed, in the rich storehouse of Buddhist teachings there are many things which do help people to live life with less problems. Using wise attitudes and compassionate intentions, Buddhism teaches an effective way of dealing with the problems of the world. When these Buddhist methods actually work, they give people faith and confidence that there really is something in this Buddhist path which is valuable to them. I often reflect on why people come here to the Buddhist Society on a Friday evening. It''s because they get something out of this. What they get out of these teachings is a more peaceful life style, a happier feeling toward themselves and more acceptance of other beings. It is in that sense a therapy for the problems of life, and it does actually work. However that''s not what Buddhism really is, that''s only one of its side affects. Philosophy. Some people come across Buddhism and they find it''s a marvellous philosophy. They can sit around the coffee table after I''ve given a talk and they can talk for hours and still not be close to enlightenment. Very often people can discuss very high-minded things; their brains can talk about and think about such sublime subjects. Then they go out and swear at the first car that pulls out in front of them on the way home. They lose it all straight away. Ritual. Or instead of looking at Buddhism as a philosophy, many people look at it as a religion. The rituals of Buddhism are meaningful, and they shouldn''t be discarded just because one thinks one is above ritual. I know people are sometimes very proud, arrogant even, and think they don''t need any rituals. But the truth of the matter is that rituals do have a psychological potency. For example, it is useful in society when two people are going to live together that they go through some sort of marriage ceremony. Because in that ceremony there is something that happens to the mind, something that happens to the heart. There is a commitment made deep inside which echoes with the knowledge that something important has happened. In the ceremonies and rituals of death, all of those rites of chanting, reflection and kind words actually have a meaning for the people involved. It does help them to come to accept with grace the passing of a loved one. It helps them acknowledge the truth of what''s happened, that a final separation from that person has occurred. And in that acceptance they come to peace. In the same way, at our monastery, in order to forgive another person and to let go of past hurt, a ceremony of forgiveness is often used. In the Catholic Church they have the ceremony of confession. The precise details of a forgiveness ceremony don''t really matter, but what is important is that forgiveness is given, by some physical means through some ritual or ceremony. If you just say, "Oh I''m sorry", isn''t that a lot different from also giving a present, or a bunch of flowers? Or isn''t it different from going up to them and saying "look, what I did the other day was really unforgivable, but come out to dinner with me this evening", or "here have a couple of tickets to the theatre"? It''s much deeper and more effective when you weave a beautiful ceremony around forgiveness rather than just muttering a few words. Even the ritual of bowing to a Buddha has a great meaning. It''s an act of humility. It''s saying I''m not enlightened and yet there is something that is beyond me which I am aspiring towards. It''s the same humility that a person has when they go to school, or university and they acknowledge that the lecturers and the professors know more than they do. If you argue with professors when you go to university, are you going to learn anything? Humility is not subservience, which denies the worth of yourself, But humility is that which respects the different qualities in people. Sometimes the act of bowing, if it''s done mindfully, is a ceremony, a ritual that can generate a great sense of joy. As a monk many people bow to me, and I bow to many others. There is always someone that you have to bow to no matter how senior you are. At the very least there is always the Buddha to bow down to. I enjoy bowing. When there is a monk who is senior to me, bowing is a beautiful way of overcoming ego and judging, especially when I must bow to a really rotten monk (the good monks are easy to bow to). This is a ritual which if done in the right way can produce so many benefits. At the very least, as I tell people at the monastery, if you do a lot of bowing it strengthens your stomach muscles and you don''t look fat! But it''s more than that. So these Buddhist rituals are useful, but Buddhism is much more than that. Meditation and Enlightenment. When you ask what Buddhism really is, it''s a hard question to answer in a few words. You have to come back to this process of meditation because there is the crux, the fulcrum of Buddhism, the heart of Buddhism. As everybody who has ever come across the Buddhist teachings would know, the Buddha was a man who became enlightened while meditating under a tree. A few minutes ago you were doing the same meditation for half an hour! Why where you not enlightened? That enlightenment of the Buddha was actually what created this religion of Buddhism. It is its meaning, it is its centre. Buddhism is all about enlightenment; not just about living a healthy life, or a happy life, or learning to be wise and saying smart things to your friends around the coffee table. Again Buddhism is all about this enlightenment. First of all you have to get some feeling or indication of what enlightenment actually is. Sometimes people come up to me and say "I''m enlightened", and I sometimes get letters from people saying "thank you for your teachings, please know that I am enlightened now". And sometimes I hear other people say of teachers or gurus "Oh Yeah, they are certainly enlightened" without really knowing what that means. The word enlightenment stands for some opening of wisdom, some understanding which stops all suffering. The person who hasn''t abandoned all suffering is never enlightened. The fact that a person still suffers means that they are yet to abandon all their attachments. The person who is still worried about their possessions, who still cries at the death of a loved one, who is still angry, and who is still enjoying the pleasures of the senses like sex, they are not enlightened. Enlightenment is something beyond and free from all that. Sometimes when a monk talks like this he can very easily put people off. Monks seem like "wowsers" , as they say in Australia. They don''t go to the movies, don''t have any sex, don''t have any relationships, don''t go on holidays, don''t have any pleasures. What a bunch of wowsers! But the interesting thing which many people notice, is that some of the most peaceful and happy people you meet are the monks and nuns who come and sit here on a Friday evening and give the talks. Monks are quite different from wowsers, and the reason is that there is another happiness which the monks know and which the Buddha has pointed out to them. Each one of you can sense that same happiness when your meditation starts to take off. Letting Go. The Buddha taught that it is attachment that causes suffering and letting go is the cause for happiness and the way to enlightenment. Letting go! So often people have asked how do you let go? What they really mean is, why do you let go? It''s a difficult question to answer and it will never be answered in words. Instead I answer that question by saying "Now is the time to meditate, cross your legs, be in the present moment," because this is teaching people what letting go is all about. Moreover, the final moments of the meditation are the most important. Please always remember this. In the last few minutes ask yourself, "How do I feel?" "What is this like and why?" "How did this come about?" People meditate because it''s fun, it''s enjoyable. They don''t meditate to "get something out of it," even though when you meditate there are a lot of good benefits to be had such as health benefits or reducing stress in your life. Through meditation you become less intolerant, less angry. But there is something more to it than that - it''s just the sheer fun of it! When I was a young monk that''s what made me become a Buddhist. It was inspiring to read the books but that was not good enough. It was when I meditated and became peaceful, very peaceful, incredibly peaceful, that something told me that this was the most profound experience of my life. I wanted to experience this again. I wanted to investigate it more. Why? Because one deep experience of meditation is worth a thousand talks, or arguments, or books, or theories. The things you read in books are other people''s experiences, they are not your own. They''re words and they might inspire, but the actual experience itself is truly moving. It''s truly earth shattering because it shatters that which you''ve rested on for such a long time. By inclining along this path of meditation you''re actually learning what letting go really is. Acknowledge, Forgive and Let Go (AFL). For those of you who have difficulty meditating, it''s because you haven''t learned to let go yet in the meditation. Why can''t we let go of simple things like past and future? Why are we so concerned with what someone else did to us or said to us today? The more you think about it, the more stupid it is. You know the old saying, "When someone calls you an idiot, the more times you remember it, the more times they''ve called you an idiot!" If you let it go immediately, you will never think about it again. They only called you an idiot at most once. It''s gone! It''s finished. You''re free. Why is it that we imprison ourselves with our past? Why can''t we even let that go? Do you really want to be free? Then acknowledge, forgive and let go, what I call in Australia the "AFL Code" - Acknowledge, forgive, and let go of whatever has hurt you, whether it''s something that somebody has done or said, or whether it''s what life has done. For instance, someone has died in your family and you argue with yourself that they shouldn''t have died. Or you''ve lost your job and you think without stop that that shouldn''t have happened. Or simply something has gone wrong and you are obsessed that it''s not fair. You can crucify yourself on a cross of your own making for the rest of your life if you want to; but no one is forcing you to. Instead you can acknowledge forgive and learn in the forgiving. The letting go is in the learning. The letting go gives the future a freedom to flow easily, unchained to the past. I was talking to some people recently about the Cambodian community here in Perth and, being a Buddhist community, I have had much to do with them. Like any traditional Buddhists, when they have a problem they come and speak to the monks. This is what they have done for centuries. The monastery and the monks are the social centre, the religious centre, and the counselling centre of the community. When men have arguments with their wives they come to the monastery. Once when I was a young monk in Thailand, a man came into the monastery and asked me "Can I stay in the monastery for a few days?". I thought he wanted to meditate, so I said "Oh you want to meditate?" "Oh no", he said "the reason I want to come to the monastery is because I''ve had an argument with my wife." So he stayed in the monastery. Three or four days later he came up to me and said, "I feel better now, can I go home". What a wise thing that was. Instead of going to the bar and getting drunk, instead of going to his mates and telling them all the rotten things that he thought his wife had done thereby reinforcing his ill will and resentment, he went to stay with a group of monks who didn''t say anything about his wife, who were just kind and peaceful. He thought about what he had been doing in that peaceful, supportive environment, and after a while he felt much better. This is what a monastery sometimes is: it''s the counselling centre, the refuge, the place where people come to let go of their problems. Isn''t that better than lingering on the past, especially when we are angry at something that has happened? When we reinforce the resentment, are we really seeing what''s going on? Or are we seeing through the perverted glasses of our anger, looking at the faults in the other person, focussing only on the terrible things they have done to us, never really seeing the full picture? One of the things I noticed about the Cambodian community was that these were all people who had suffered through the Pol Pot years. I know of a Cambodian man whose wife had been shot by the Khmer Rouge in front of him, for stealing a mango. She was hungry so she took a mango from a tree. One of the Khmer Rouge cadres saw her and, without any trial, he pulled out his gun in front of her husband and shot her dead. When this man was telling me this, I was looking at his face, looking at his bodily movements, and it was amazing to see that there was no anger, there was no resentment, there was not even grief there. There was a peaceful acceptance about what had happened. It shouldn''t have happened but it did. Letting go of the past is so we can enjoy the present, so the future can be free. Why is it that we always carry around the past? Attachment to the past is not a theory, it is an attitude. We can say, "Oh I''m not attached". Or we can say, "I''m so detached I''m not even attached to detachment," which is very clever, and sounds very good, but is a lot of old rubbish. You know if you''re attached if you can''t let go of those important things that cause you to suffer, that stop you being free. Attachment is a ball and chain, which you tie around your own legs. No one else ties it around you. You''ve got the key to free yourselves, but you don''t use it. Why do we limit ourselves so and why can''t we let go of the future, all the concerns and the worries? Do you worry about what''s going to happen next, tomorrow, next week, next year? Why do you do that? How many times have you worried about some exam or some test, or a visit to the Doctors, or a visit to the Dentist? You can worry yourself sick and when you get ready to go to the dentist you find they have cancelled your appointment, and you didn''t have to go anyway! Things never work out as you expect them to. Haven''t we learnt yet that the future is so uncertain that it doesn''t bear worrying about? We never know what''s going to happen next. When we let go of the past and the future, isn''t that being on the path to deep meditation? Aren''t we actually learning about how to be at peace, how to be free, how to be content. These are indications of what enlightenment means. It means seeing that many of our attachments are based on sheer stupidity. We just don''t need this. As we develop this meditation deeper, we let go more and more. The more we let go the more happiness and peace it gives us. This is why the Buddha called this whole path of Buddhism a gradual training. It''s the path that leads one on, one step at a time, and at every step you get a prize. That''s why it''s a very delightful path and the prizes get more delightful and more valuable the further you go. But even on the first step you get a prize. I still remember the first time I meditated. I remember the room. It was at Cambridge University, in the Wordsworth Room at Kings College. I''d never done any meditation before, so I just sat down there for five or ten minutes with a few of my mates. It was only ten minutes but I thought "Oh that was nice", I still remember that feeling. There was something that was resonating inside of me, telling me that this was a path which was leading somewhere wonderful. I''d discussed over coffee and over beer with my friends all types of philosophy, but the "discussions" had always ended in arguments and they never made me happier. Even the great professors at the university, who you get to know very well, didn''t seem happy. That was one of the reasons why I didn''t continue an academic career. They were brilliant in their field but in other ways they were as stupid as ordinary people. They would have arguments, worry and stress just like everyone else. And that really struck me. Why in such a famous university, where people are so intelligent, are they not happy? What''s the point of being clever if it doesn''t give you happiness? I mean real happiness, real contentment, and real peace. Real contentment and peace. The first person I saw who had real contentment and peace was Ajahn Chah, my teacher in Thailand. There was something about that man! I saw what he had and I said to myself, "I want that, I want that understanding, that peace". People from all over the world would come to see him. Just because he was a monk didn''t mean that everyone was subservient, obsequious and always praising him. Some people would go and argue with him and try to catch him out or even shout at him. I remember a story about the first time he went to England with Ajahn Sumedho. He went on alms round in Hampstead and as he was walking on alms round, this was over twenty years ago, this young hooligan came up to this funnily dressed Asian and threw a punch at him just missing his nose. Ajahn Chah did not know this person was trying to miss. Then he tried to kick him and just missed. He was just trying to wind up this little Asian monk in funny clothes. Ajahn Chah didn''t know when he was going to be hit. He never did get hit, because he kept peaceful, kept cool and never got angry. Afterwards, he said England was a very good place and that he wanted to send all his senior monks over there to really test them out. As for Ajahn Chah, he had equanimity in practice. It''s easy saying "I''m enlightened", but then something happens like that and you run a mile. Another monk in Hampstead at the time was just going for a walk in the afternoon when he passed a pub. He didn''t realise at the time that there was a big soccer match between England and Scotland on that day. It had already finished and the Scots supporters where in the pub getting drunk. Around this period, there was a popular TV series about a Kung Fu monk who, when he was small, was called "grasshopper." These sozzled Scots soccer fans looked through the window of the pub and said "Och it''s wee grasshopper," and this monk took fright. These where big Scotsmen and they were very drunk. So he started running away, and they chased him all the way back to the Temple. "Wee grasshopper" was running for his life. He lost it. But the sort of practical letting go that Ajahn Chah did in Hampstead is something which gives you a sense that you are on the road to enlightenment. A Gradual Path. The Heart of Buddhism is a gradual path, one step after another step, and you do get results. Some people say you shouldn''t meditate to get results. That''s a lot of hogwash! Meditate to get results! Meditate to be happy. Meditate to get peace. Meditate to get enlightened, little by little. But if you''re going for results, be patient. One of the problems with Westerners is that when they make goals, they are not patient enough. That''s why they get disillusioned, depressed and frustrated. They don''t give their practice enough time to mature naturally into enlightenment. It takes time, maybe a few life times even, so don''t be in a rush. As you walk each step, there is always something you get out of it. Let go a little and you get freedom and peace. Let go a lot and you feel bliss. This is how I teach meditation both at my monastery and here. I encourage meditators to aim for these stages of letting go, these bliss states called Jhana. Jhanas Everyone wants to be happy, and the Jhanas are how you can achieve happiness, I mean real happiness, deep happiness. The only trouble is these states don''t last very long, only a few hours, but still they are very attractive. They arise through letting go, real letting go. In particular they arise through letting go of will, choice, control. It''s a fascinating thing to experience a deep meditation and understand how it comes about. Through such an experience you realise that the more you control, the more you crave because of attachments, the less peaceful you get. But the more you let go, the more you abandon, the more you get out of the way, the happier you feel. Now this is a teaching of something very profound, much deeper than you can read in a book or hear in a talk and certainly much more useful than discussing these things over a coffee table. You''re actually experiencing something. This is getting towards the heart of religion, that which people call mysticism. You''re actually experiencing it for your self. In particular you are letting go of this "controller," this "doer." Now that is the prime problem for human beings. We can''t stop messing things up. Very often we should just leave things alone but we can''t, we don''t. Instead we make a mess. Why can''t you just relax and enjoy yourself instead of always doing something? It''s hard to stop in meditation, but the more you stop the more rewards you get, the more peace you get. When you let go in meditation, let go the will, let go of the control, when you stop talking to yourself, you get inner silence. How many of you are fed up yet with this racket that goes on inside your head all the time? How many of you sometimes can''t get to sleep at night when there''s no noise from the neighbours but there is something even louder between your ears. Yak, Yak, Yak, Worry, Worry, Worry, Think, Think, Think! This is the problem with human beings, when it''s time to think they can''t think clearly and when it''s time to stop thinking they can''t be at peace. When we learn how to meditate we get this sense of being more balanced, and we know how to let go. We now how to let go to the point where all thoughts disappear. These thoughts are just commentaries, they''re just descriptions. The difference between thought and reality is the difference between, say, reading a book about New York and going to New York. Which is more real? When you''re there, you smell the air, you feel the atmosphere, you sense the character, all of which are things you can''t write in a book. The truth is always silent. The lie is always with words. When the Body Disappears. Remember "con men," "con women" as well. These con men can sell you anything! There''s one living in your mind right now, and you believe every word he says! His name is Thinking. When you let go of that inner talk and get silent, you get happy. Then when you let go of the movement of the mind and stay with the breath, you experience even more delight. Then when you let go of the body ,all these five senses disappear and you''re really blissing out. This is original Buddhism. Sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch completely vanish. This is like being in a sensory deprivation chamber but much better. But it''s not just silence, you just don''t hear anything. It''s not just blackness, you just don''t see anything. It''s not just a feeling of comfort in the body, there is no body at all. When the body disappears that really starts to feel great. You know of all those people who have out of the body experiences? When the body dies, every person has that experience, they float out of the body. And one of the things they always say is it''s so peaceful, so beautiful, so blissful. It''s the same in meditation when the body disappears, it''s so peaceful, so beautiful, so blissful when you are free from this body. What''s left? Here there''s no sight, sound, smell, taste, touch. This is what the Buddha called the mind in deep meditation. When the body disappears what is left is the mind. I gave a simile to a monk the other night. Imagine an Emperor who is wearing a long pair of trousers and a big tunic. He''s got shoes on his feet, a scarf around the bottom half of his head and a hat on the top half of his head. You can''t see him at all because he''s completely covered in five garments. It''s the same with the mind. It''s completely covered with sight, sound, smell, taste and touch. So people don''t know it. They just know the garments. When they see the Emperor, they just see the robes and the garments. They don''t know who lives inside them. And so it is no wonder they''re confused about what is life, what is mind, who is this inside of here, were did I come from? Why? What am I supposed to be doing with this life? When the five senses disappear, it''s like unclothing the Emperor and seeing what is actually in here, what''s actually running the show, who''s listening to these words, who''s seeing, who''s feeling life, who this is. When the five senses disappear, you''re coming close to the answer to those questions. What you''re seeing in such deep meditation is that which we call "mind," (in Pali it''s called Citta). The Buddha used this beautiful simile. When there is a full moon on a cloudy night, even though it''s a full moon, you can hardly see it. Sometimes when the clouds are thin, you can see this hazy shape shining though. You know there is something there. This is like the meditation just before you''ve entered into these profound states. You know there is something there, but you can''t quite make it out. There''s still some "clothes" left. You''re still thinking and doing, feeling the body or hearing sounds. But there does come a time, and this is the Buddha''s simile, when the moon is released from the clouds and there in the clear night sky you can see the beautiful full disc of the moon shining brilliantly, and you know that''s the moon. The moon is there; the moon is real, and it''s not just some sort of side effect of the clouds. This is what happens in meditation when you see the mind. You see clearly that the mind is not some side effect of the brain. You see the mind, and you know the mind. The Buddha said that the mind released is beautiful, is brilliant, is radiant. So not only are these blissful experiences, they''re meaningful experiences as well. How many people may have heard about rebirth but still don''t really believe it? How can rebirth happen? Certainly the body doesn''t get reborn. That''s why when people ask me where do you go when you die, "one of two places" I say "Fremantle or Karrakatta" that''s where the body goes! But is that where the mind goes? Sometimes people are so stupid in this world, they think the body is all there is, that there is no mind. So when you get cremated or buried that''s it, that''s done with, all has ended. The only way you can argue with this view is by developing the meditation that the Buddha achieved under the Bodhi tree. Then you can see the mind for yourself in clear awareness - not in some hypnotic trance, not in dullness - but in the clear awareness. This is knowing the mind Knowing the Mind. When you know that mind, when you see it for yourself, one of the results will be an insight that the mind is independent of this body. Independence means that when this body breaks up and dies, when it''s cremated or when it''s buried, or however it''s destroyed after death, it will not affect the mind. You know this because you see the nature of the mind. That mind which you see will transcend bodily death. The first thing which you will see for yourself, the insight which is as clear as the nose on your face, is that there is something more to life than this physical body that we take to be me. Secondly you can recognise that that mind, essentially, is no different than that process of consciousness which is in all beings. Whether it''s human beings or animals or even insects, of any gender, age or race, you see that that which is in common to all life is this mind, this consciousness, the source of doing. Once you see that, you have much more respect for your fellow beings. Not just respect for your own race, your own tribe or your own religion, not just for human beings, but for all beings. It''s a wonderfully high-minded idea. "May all beings be happy and well and may we respect all nations, all peoples, even all beings." However this is how you achieve that! You truly get compassion only when we see that others are fundamentally just as ourselves. If you think that a cow is completely different from you, that cows don''t think like human beings, then it''s easy to eat one. But can you eat your grandmother? She''s too much like you. Can you eat an ant? Maybe you''d kill an ant because you think that ants aren''t like you. But if you look carefully at ants, they are no different. In a forest monastery living out in the bush, close to nature, one of the things you become so convinced of is that animals have emotions and , especially, feel pain. You begin to recognise the personality of the animals, of the Kookaburras,(Australian bird) of the mice, the ants, and the spiders. Each one of those spiders has a mind just like you have. Once you see that you can understand the Buddha''s compassion for all beings. You can also understand how rebirth can occur between all species - not just human beings to human beings, but animals to humans, humans to animals. You can understand also how the mind is the source of all this. The mind can exist even without a body in the realms of ghosts and angels (what we call in Buddhism Devas). It becomes very clear to you how they exist, why they exist, what they are. These are insights and understandings which come from deep meditation. But more than that, when you know the nature of the mind then you know the nature of consciousness. You know the nature of stillness. You know the nature of life. You understand what makes this mind go round and round and round, what makes this mind seek rebirth. You understand the law of Kamma. The Three Knowledges. The First Knowledge. When the Buddha sat under the Bodhi tree, according to tradition he gained three knowledge''s. The first knowledge was the memory of past lives. When you get close to the mind, there are certain powers that come with that experience. The powers are no more than an ability, a dexterity with the use of the mind. It''s like the difference between a dog that has been running wild and a dog that has been well trained. You can tell the trained dog to go and pick up the newspaper. It wags its tail and goes and picks up the newspaper for you. Some people have got their dogs so well trained that they can actually pick up the telephone. Maybe they could answer the telephone as well, then that would really save you a lot of time! When you get to these deep states of meditation often, the mind becomes well trained. One of the things which the Buddha did (and which you can do when you get into deep meditation) is tell the mind to go back to the past. What''s your earliest memory? Go back further and further and further. Monks who do this get early memories of their childhood. They even get memories of the moment they were born. Sometimes people say that when you''re born, you have no consciousness because the neuron''s aren''t developed yet, or something like that. But when you re-experience your birth, you know that that is just not true. When the memory of your own birth appears, it is just like you are there and you experience all feelings of that birth. Then you can ask yourself for an even earlier memory, and then you get back into your past lives. That''s what the Buddha did under the Bodhi tree. Through meditation you know rebirth, you know your own past lives. This is just what happens with the mind and you know how it happens. That was the first knowledge that the Buddha had. The Second Knowledge. The second knowledge was to know how you are reborn. Why you are reborn. Where you are reborn. This is the Law of Kamma. Someone was showing me a book today which, unfortunately, we had for free distribution but which I hadn''t seen before. It had some really weird ideas in it about the Law of Kamma. I think what it said was that if you read one of the Suttas while you are lying on the ground, you will be reborn with a bad back, or something like that. Just stupid ideas! Kamma is much more complex than that and it depends mostly upon the quality of your intention. The movement of the mind itself is what determines the Kamma, not just the act, but why and where it came from. You can see this in meditation, but also you can see just how that mind gets fully liberated. The Third Knowledge. The third knowledge was the ending of suffering. With understanding of The Four Noble Truths, you realise the Way and what enlightenment really means. It means freedom! The mind is liberated, especially liberated from the body, liberated not just from the suffering of the body but liberated from the happiness of the body as well. That means that there is no more inclination for sexuality, no fear of pain, no grief over the destruction of the body, no ill will and no fear of criticism. Why do people get worried about bad words that are said? Only because of ego. They take something to be themselves. Just imagine for a moment being free from all of those things. What would that be like, no fear, no craving, no need to move from this moment - In other words nothing missing, and nothing left to do, nowhere to go because you''re completely happy right here no matter what happens! This is what we mean by enlightenment. This meditation is the source of the Buddha''s enlightenment and the source of every person''s enlightenment. There is no enlightenment without that meditation. This is why Buddhism is far more than a psychotherapy. It''s far more than a philosophy. It''s far more than a religion. It goes deep into the nature of being, and it is accessible to all people. You know how to meditate. Teachers are giving all the instructions free without any charge. Do you want to do it? Usually the answer is, "Maybe tomorrow but not today." Never the less because the seeds have been placed in the mind, because the meditation has begun already, there is an interest. Already there is a sense of this enlightenment, a fascination for peace, and you will not be able to resist that path. You may be able to put it off for a while, maybe for lifetimes, but it''s a strange thing that, as someone said to me many years ago, "When you hear these teachings you can''t discard them." You just can''t forget them. They aren''t telling you what to believe. They aren''t giving you a theory which is merely rational. But they are pointing you to something which you can understand and experience for yourself, and you get intuitions of this the deeper you go. The Buddha was a very remarkable person, his peacefulness, compassion and wisdom, were legendary. There is something about enlightenment that is very attractive. In the same way there is something about freedom that you cannot ignore. That is why little by little, you will understand what Buddhism is all about. You won''t understand Buddhism from the books nor will you understand Buddhism from what I say. You''ll only understand Buddhism in your own experiences of peaceful meditation. That''s where Buddhism is taught. So have fun with your meditation and don''t be afraid of enlightenment. Get in there, enjoy it, and you will have no regrets. That''s what Buddhism is. That''s it''s heart, meditation and enlightenment. That''s it''s meaning. I hope you can understand some of this. I can say no more because the time has gone. I''ll complete my talk now. Notes. .Wowser: n. extreme puritan, kill-joy, teetotaller, spoil-sport."The Australian Oxford Dictionary" (New Budget Edition). Herron Publications: West End, Qld. 1998 .The AFL (Australian Football League) code is also the acronym for the most popular form of Australian football."Aussie Rules" .Fremantle and Karrakatta are the two main cemeteries/crematoriums serving the whole of Perth.
Multi Quote Quote
Adakah jalan lain jika kita tidak memungkinkan untuk menjadi Bhikkhu tapi kita tetap ingin melenyapkan lingkaran roda hidup mati ini? Mungkinkah ? Bukankah jika kita membiarkan semuanya berlalu, begitu gampang melepas segalanya karena kita berpikir bahwa semuanya toh adalah tidak kekal, bukankah kemajuan manusia akan berhenti? Atas jawaban anda, banyak terima kasih saya ucapkan. Menjadi bhikku tidak gampang. Harus menjalankan banyak peraturan2 yang mengekang indera. Jadi jangan buru2 … praktekkan ajaran2 untuk umat awam dulu seperti kedermawanan, kemoralan, dan (up to a certain point) meditasi. Kalau nanti udah siap (can be this life, can be future life) baru jadi bhikku … smile Menjadi seorang umat awam (lay people), apabila anda berkeluarga, masih bisa mencapai tingkat kesucian Sotapana dan Sakadagami. Untuk tingkat kesucian Anagami dan Arahat, memang harus menjadi bhikku, atau minimal, hidup dengan lifestyle layaknya bhikku (e.g. eight preceptor di vihara). Mengenai pertanyaan kedua, sebenarnya dari sisi luar memang kelihatannya begitu. Ajaran2 Buddhist terkesan membiarkan segalanya sebagaimana apa adanya, jadi kapan manusia bisa maju kalau ngak ada hawa nafsu? smile Sebenarnya itu salah satu mispersepsi terbesar. Dikatakan bahwa Arahat tidak punya keinginan. Kalau mereka tidak punya keinginan, kalau kebelet mau pipis masa ngak ada keinginan ke toilet? Dan pernah ke Wat Pa Pong di Thailand? Vihara hutan itu indah sekali .. tempat sembahyangnya dirancang oleh Ajahn Liem (yang konon udah Arahat). Kalau udah Arahat kok bisa punya keinginan untuk merancang layaknya arsitek? Ajahn Chah jauh2 ke England untuk mendirikan Sangha di sana. Itu juga keinginan. Saya rasa bedanya adalah para Arahat punya keinginan (tentu saja hanya keinginan yang baik, untuk keinginan yang jahat tidak mungkin timbul lagi) .. but they don''t hold to desires. Kalau bisa dilakukan, yang mereka lakukan, kalau ngak bisa yang ngak apa2. Absolutely no suffering .. they see the nature of desires .. they are the master of their own minds. They put things down. They don''t hold or cling to things. Kedua, kemajuan dunia apa yang anda maksud? Kemajuan materi? Sekarang kemajuan materi lumayan tinggi, tapi orang2 stress mental makin banyak berkeliaran :rofl: Pemakai narkoba makin banyak. Kita memang perlu materi. Tapi materi tidak menyelesaikan semua problem manusia. Usia tua, sakit, mati, perasaan hampa, depresi, mental disorder tidak bisa diselesaikan tuntas oleh kemajuan iptek. Jadi keinginan materi juga mesti dalam batas batas wajar. Kebanyakan umat manusia jaman sekarang tujuan hidupnya adalah mengecap sebanyak2nya kenikmatan indera yang dihasilkan kemajuan materi. iPod, handphone music, online games, internet chatting, travel to Paris, surfing in Bali, makan seafood .. etc … smile) The world is too driven by pleasures .. seeks pleasures … diperbudak pleasures … Btw … saya juga masih menikmati … smile Cuma yang wajar2 aja .. menjadi Buddhist berarti anda mesti paling tidak mengurangi kenikmatan2 indera terutama yang off-limit .. such as no alcohol, no seafood, ngak boleh tepuk nyamuk, kecoa ngak boleh bunuh, dagang ngak boleh nipu, etc … smile Mengejar materi secara berlebihan juga akan mengikis nilai2 kesabaran kita. Dulu naik becak atau naik mobil tanpa AC ok2 aja .. sekarang banyak yang naik mobil mesti pakai AC .. kalau ngak ada AC ngak mau! Atau dari rumah mau ke tempat potong rambut yang cuma 200 meter aja mesti bawa mobil. Jalan kaki pegal! Potong rambut juga mesti ke salon2 yang mahal2 sekarang. Tidur kalau pakai tikar udah ngak mau … mesti soft bed yang tingginya 50 centi … smile Sang Buddha menggambarkan the way of seeking maximum sensual pleasures in this world as the loose way … sebanyak2nya anda mereguk pleasures … tetap aja ngak akan terpuaskan. The Endless Way. Ibarat orang haus disuruh minum air garam. Pikiran terus menipu kita bahwa kita harus punya the latest thing .. hp mesti model baru, rambut mesti ikut fashion, etc … tapi kita tertipu terus. Yang "baru" sebentar lagi juga jadi yang "kuno". Malah saya merasa jaman sekarang arus perubahan terlampau cepat dibanding jamannya orang tua atau nenek kita. Trend2 dan model2 seperti handphone terbaru atau designer cloth terbaru cepat sekali datang dan berlalu. Yang ikut2an mode2 seperti itu butuh banyak duit (dan "canggihnya" bank2 semakin banyak menawarkan credit card supaya bisa ngutang untuk gaya hidup consumptive) .. ngak heran sekarang harus banting tulang kerja 2 shift sehari … atau pusing ama tagihan credit card … atau main saham kalau 1 minggu ngak naik2 aja udah stress :rofl: Orang2 seperti itu juga tidak berkeinginan melakukan jasa2 kebaikan dan belajar melepas. Disuruh berdana ke fakir miskin atau vihara/gereja susah minta ampun … tapi kalau beli HP model baru ngak suruh dia dengan suka rela merogoh kantong. Dan ketika kematian datang.. kesenangan2 itu tidak membantu sama sekali. Your time is up … sang tukang jagal sudah datang. Where are you going after death? If you aren''t enlightened yet .. you should have at least some store of merit … otherwise .. you are in trouble … Hidup sederhana belum tentu menderita. Ini salah satu contohnya: Saya sering berkunjung ke Ubon Ratchatani di Thailand. Itu kota kecil .. tidak ada mal2 besar di sana, atau hiburan yang banyak. Tapi saya betah di sana. Penduduk kotanya ramah2 dan sopan2 … mereka kelihatan puas dan bahagia … setiap hari penduduk2nya dengan senang hati membawa makanan2 dan persembahan2 ke vihara (Wat Pa Pong). Mereka kebanyakan petani yang tidak kaya .. tapi masih bisa praktek dana tiap hari .. hebat kan? Lalu lintas juga adem adem aja. Di situ ngak kayak Jakarta yang klaksonnya bisa bikin tuli .. :rofl: Saya sering ditawarin tumpangan gratis oleh orang yang ngak dikenal … pernah saya waktu lagi jalan pulang dari vihara ditawarin numpang di atas kereta pengangkut telur yang kebetulan lagi menuju ke arah kota … smile Jadi kepuasan atau contentment itu parameter kebahagiaan yang lebih nyata .. rata2 warga Ubon Ratchatani jauh lebih bahagia dibanding orang2 kaya di Jkt karena mereka mudah terpuaskan dengan sedikit materi … Jkt jauh lebih maju secara materi tapi orang2nya lebih stress karena keinginan berlebihan. Kota2 yang lebih maju lagi seperti Spore atau Hongkong lebih parah lagi … pernah lihat mereka jalan pas mau kerja? Seperti lagi setengah lari … seperti robot yang disetel .. apa enaknya yah? :rofl: The Buddha said: Contentment is the greatest wealth.
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Terima kasih atas jawabannya, bung Funda………. Yup, bisa menerima segala sesuatu yang terjadi dengan lapang dada adalah salah satu jalan menuju kebahagiaan. Dan bisa berpuas hati terhadap yang didapat adalah juga salah satu jalan mendapatkan kebahagiaan….. Sayangnya dalam zaman kompetensi ini, personal yang gampang cepat berpuas hati biasanya dipandang rendah oleh sekitarnya….. Lingkungan memaksa agar manusia selalu tertantang untuk mengungguli lainnya……… Padahal di atas langit masih ada langit, kompetensi tak pernah akan ada habisnya…… Harta dan kedudukan menjadi simbol dan cerminan dari kualitas seseorang…… Manusia dilahirkan seakan-akan hanya untuk tujuan tersebut……… Padahal kualitas seseorang diukur dari pikiran, perkataan dan perbuatannya……….. Mengutip apa yang anda tuliskan : Accumulating wealth, what meaning has that? It all disappears when you die. Indulging in the pleasures of life, even if you manage to get them in great amounts, usually just bring lots of frustrations. If you do get lots and lots of pleasure in this life, so what! It always disappears in the pain and fog of old age. One of the things that you notice in life, as you get older, is that most of the pleasures in life occur early on and the pain of life is what you''re mostly left with at the end. Knowing this, seeing the dangers in life, why does anybody get involved in all this wasting of time? Perkataan di atas tepat sekali…….. Harta yang banyak bukan jaminan kebahagiaan…… Semakin kaya seseorang, semakin banyak yang perlu dia kuatirkan… Semakin banyak yang dikuatirkan, tak mungkin akan ada ketenangan pikiran sebagai sumber kebahagiaan….. Tetapi tanpa harta, kita juga akan menjadi susah, yang penting adalah keseimbangan………. Jangan biarkan keserakahan merasuki kita ……..
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Btw … saya juga masih menikmati … Cuma yang wajar2 aja .. menjadi Buddhist berarti anda mesti paling tidak mengurangi kenikmatan2 indera terutama yang off-limit .. such as no alcohol, no seafood, ngak boleh tepuk nyamuk, kecoa ngak boleh bunuh, dagang ngak boleh nipu, etc … Mengutip apa yang anda tuliskan: Apakah anda tidak pernah membunuh nyamuk dan kecoa? Dua makhluk tersebut saya kira semua pernah membunuhnya……… Kita semua tahu betapa bahayanya deman berdarah…. Juga saya penasaran dengan Bhikkhu hutan di thailand sana, apa yang mereka lakukan terhadap nyamuk tersebut mengingat gigitan nyamuk tersebut bisa membahayakan ? Apakah mereka memakai lotion nyamuk atau mereka menyadari gigitan tersebut tetapi hanya sekedar mengamati dalam pikiran dan membiarkannya berlalu? Di Ekayana Grha, pernah saya dengarkan ceramah mengenai Nian Fo, melafal nama Buddha Amitabha….. Apa pendapat anda mengenai pelafalan nama Buddha tersebut? Mengingat pelafalan nama tersebut berkaitan dengan kematian yang saya tanyakan, mohon anda memberikan penjelasan.
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