Indonesia: news/indikator ekonomi, moneter dan perbankan

Indonesia''s Q4 GDP up 4.1-5.2 pct yr-on-yr after 5.34 pct Q3 rise 14/02/2006 2:33:15 PM JAKARTA (AFX) - Gunawan said output growth in the agriculture and mining sectors, which declined in the fourth quarter may continue to do so this year. :$-) :$-)
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Kekhawatiran bank sentral ini didukung ekonom Standard Chartered Bank, Fauzi Ichsan. Dia mengatakan langkah pemerintah memindahkan dana ke perbankan bertentangan dengan kebijakan moneter ketat BI. Suntikan dana, ujar Fauzi, dapat memicu inflasi karena peredaran uang bertambah banyak. “Karena dana pemerintah tersebut merupakan dana di luar sistem perbankan.” Fauzi menilai pemerintah sebaiknya fokus kepada perbaikan iklim investasi daripada menyuntikkan dana untuk stimulasi kredit. “Karena kredit pada dasarnya dipengaruhi oleh suku bunga dan iklim investasi.” Bila suku bunga tetap tinggi, perbankan akan memilih memarkir uangnya di SBI yang minim risiko. Nah betulkan, mau cetak uang lagi. Sayang saham Perum Peruri dan Supplier tinta security ink tidak dijual di BEJ. Bakal cuan nih smile
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Boediono Optimistic Economy Will Grow 6% Selasa, 21 Februari 2006 18:47:08 StockWatch (Jakarta) - Coordinating Minister for Economy, Boediono, said he is optimistic Indonesia''s economy will grow by 6% this year, and the economic growth in the near term will reach 6-7%. “We will seek to reach the highest growth level. Reaching nearly 6% is not an impossible thing to do if the domestic condition is really conducive,” he said today (21/2) after opening a seminar themed “Infrastructure Development Acceleration” at the Borobudur Hotel, Jakarta. Having such economic growth, he said further, the government will be able to solve problems like unemployement, poverty, and to use the growth as means for transforming the economic structure. Once the target is reached, he added, he is optimistic the economy will grow up to a higher level in the near future. Meanwhile, StockWatch data showed that based on Bank Indonesia (BI) projection the country''s economy will grow by merely 5-5.7% this year. In order to reach the economic growth, the country will need an investment worth IDR780 trillion, of which 37% will come from foreign capital and IDR136 trillioun from the 2006 state budget. (nls/bud)
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Growth 6% Inflasi 20% Riil Growth -14%…. seperti thn 2005 ha ha ha ha ha ha ha smile Tidak slah kalau kita merasa semakin melarat.
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Indonesia removed from FATF''s anti-money laundering supervision Rabu, 22 Februari 2006 16:15:00 JAKARTA (XFN-ASIA) - The intergovernment Financial Action Task Force (FATF) will no longer supervise Indonesia''s anti-money laundering practices as the country has implemented adequate steps to fight money laundering, said Indonesia''s Financial Transaction Reports and Analysis Center (PPATK). “The monitoring by FATF has been stopped,” task force president Kader Asmal was quoted as saying by the PPTAK. In a statement, it said the decision follows an FATF meeting held last Feb 13-17. Indonesia was removed from the FATF''s list of non-cooperative countries in February last year and has since been monitored by the task force. During the one-year monitoring, Indonesia has made “sustainable efforts” in fighting the crime, PPATK said. It said among these measures were the increase in the number of reported suspicious transaction and capacity-building measures for law enforcement officers. Remaining on the list of non-cooperative countries could lead to FATF sanctions, such as charging Indonesian banks higher rates for overseas transactions.
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Indonesia removed from FATF''s anti-money laundering supervision Rabu, 22 Februari 2006 16:15:00 JAKARTA (XFN-ASIA) - The intergovernment Financial Action Task Force (FATF) will no longer supervise Indonesia''s anti-money laundering practices as the country has implemented adequate steps to fight money laundering, said Indonesia''s Financial Transaction Reports and Analysis Center (PPATK). “The monitoring by FATF has been stopped,” task force president Kader Asmal was quoted as saying by the PPTAK. In a statement, it said the decision follows an FATF meeting held last Feb 13-17. Indonesia was removed from the FATF''s list of non-cooperative countries in February last year and has since been monitored by the task force. During the one-year monitoring, Indonesia has made “sustainable efforts” in fighting the crime, PPATK said. It said among these measures were the increase in the number of reported suspicious transaction and capacity-building measures for law enforcement officers. Remaining on the list of non-cooperative countries could lead to FATF sanctions, such as charging Indonesian banks higher rates for overseas transactions. pergantian pemain sudah selesai tampaknya. selamat datang bozz baru.
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The Biggest Sleeper\r\nIndonesia, Asia''s overlooked giant, is stable at long last. But now the hard work begins.\r\n \r\nBy George Wehrfritz and Joe Cochrane\r\nNewsweek International\r\n\r\nMarch 6, 2006 issue - Sometimes even the starting line is hard to reach in Indonesia. Just ask President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono. A few weeks ago fans converging on a speedway outside Jakarta for the city''s inaugural A1 Grand Prix turned nearby roads into parking lots, trapping the presidential motorcade. So the guest of honor exited his limousine and leapt onto the back of one of his escort motorcycles, weaving through traffic for two kilometers to reach the track and deliver a short opening speech. “I arrived two minutes before the race,” he said with a chuckle. “I was really on time.”\r\n\r\nThe same might be said for Yudhoyono''s presidency. Inaugurated 17 months ago, he is Indonesia''s first directly elected leader, and the first to show a firm hand after a series of sleepy bumblers since the fall of Indonesia''s dictator Suharto, in 1998. Yudhoyono led a highly competent response to the devastating tsunami in December 2004, and then exhibited a statesman''s touch in signing a visionary peace pact to end the long-running rebellion in the province of Aceh. For the first time in years the ethnically and politically fractured archipelago is relatively stable; the Asia Foundation''s Indonesia representative, Douglas Ramage, calls Indonesia “the sleeper democratization success story” in Asia. All this, however, has only brought the country to the starting gate—positioned for a run to reclaim its rightful place as the third giant growth story in Asia.\r\n\r\nThough it was a developing world star under Suharto, Indonesia has been fully eclipsed by larger rivals of late. The economies of India and China are each growing faster than 8 percent, while Indonesia''s growth is expected to slow down to 5.2 percent this year, which is meager for a big emerging market. For Indonesia to move up faster, it has to work harder to streamline its “high-cost economy,” a euphemism for rampant corruption and red tape. The bright side is that bottoming out creates a sense of urgency. While prosperity has dampened the political will to reform in India, fear of falling behind is helping Yudhoyono push through change. The president cut budget-breaking energy subsidies after world oil prices shot up last year, and has since been rewarded by Standard & Poor''s, which recently raised its outlook on Indonesia''s credit rating to “positive.” Indonesia''s budget deficit, as a share of GDP, is now just one percent, and one tenth of India''s.\r\n\r\nTo be sure, its comeback tale remains too confusing and uncertain to have attracted foreign investors in large numbers. Indonesia lacks the “two-sentence story” that can draw outsiders to an emerging market, says a Western diplomat in Jakarta, who requested anonymity as a matter of government policy. While China has its rise as an export manufacturing power, and India its emergence as a global headquarters for information services, Indonesia is known mainly for failing to fully exploit a rare abundance of natural resources, from timber to gold, despite booming commodity prices. This tragically botched opportunity is exemplified by the fall of Indonesian oil production (down 20 percent since 2000) in the face of spiking oil prices.\r\n\r\nBut that problem is now the target of Yudhoyono''s next big move. The president appears ready to clear the way for the American giant ExxonMobil to take charge of a long-stalled plan to tap huge oil reserves under the seabed off East Java, sidelining the state oil monopoly, Pertamina. That suggests a strong willingness to take on a powerful lobby and risk a nationalist backlash, all in the name of efficiency. In an interview with NEWSWEEK in Jakarta last week, Yudhoyono signaled a deal of some kind is imminent, without addressing the details: “The bottom line is that I have chosen the type of cooperation and joint operations to accelerate the project and produce oil in the timeliest manner,” he said. “It has nothing to do with nationalism versus internationalism.”\r\n\r\nIf ExxonMobil does take over the $2.6 billion project, it would represent the largest new foreign investment in Indonesia since the Asian financial crisis triggered Suharto''s fall. “It''s a very pivotal deal,” says T. N. Machmud, former head of Arco Indonesia. “This is a great place to invest if we can get our act together.” Opening the Cepu offshore oilfield could raise Indonesia''s oil output by 177,000 barrels a day, or nearly 20 percent, putting production back on a growth track for the first time in a long time. The imminent deal is “going to put Indonesia back on the map,” says the Western diplomat.\r\n\r\nIndonesia''s political climate augurs well for further reforms. Yudhoyono''s approval rating remains above 60 percent, according to opinion polls, despite the sluggish economy. With a string of traumas from Suharto to the tsunami now in the past, the government is moving out of crisis mode for the first time in its brief life as a democracy. Yudhoyono doesn''t face re-election until 2009, and he and his team have front-loaded painful reforms so they have time to revive economic growth before the voters pass judgment. Sjahrir, a top Yudhoyono adviser (who goes by one name), routinely draws parallels with a recent American president. "I always quote Bill Clinton''s , ‘'It’'s the economy, stupid,'' in my memos to the president,“ he says, adding: ”He knows that, too.“\r\n\r\nYudhoyono''s attack on the ”high-cost economy“ is a complex war on many fronts. Jakarta has begun to streamline bureaucracy and to rewrite tax, business and labor codes. Citing a favorite World Bank measure of a nation''s business environment, Yudhoyono says he has already cut the time it takes to register a business from 150 days to 60, and vows to ”do my best to bring it down to one month.“ He is orchestrating the biggest anti-corruption campaign in Indonesia''s history. Since its launch last year the campaign has claimed what political analyst Salim Said says is an unprecedented number of high-profile targets, including a provincial governor and a former cabinet minister. All this bears the stamp of orthodox freemarket reform, as typically prescribed by the World Bank and International Monetary Fund. But don''t say that in Jakarta. ”We don''t want to use the term ‘'Western style’',“ says Said. ”Western liberalism is anathema, and capitalism is hated here, but we''re doing both.“\r\n\r\nYudhoyono''s campaign is controversial even within his cabinet, which is divided between reformers and nationalists who are less enthusiastic about embracing globalization. The reformers are mainly free marketeers who ”hang pictures of Milton Friedman on their office walls,“ as Ramage puts it, and they control the briefs that set overall strategy, like the Ministry of Finance. But they do not control many of the ministries that actually execute policy, including Health, Agriculture, Education and Tax. The result is that even well-intentioned efforts to improve efficiency can founder. One example: the clumsy response to avian flu, which has spread to 27 of the country''s 33 provinces, and killed 20 people. It still takes ”nerves of steel“ for foreigners to enter the market, says Malaysian lawyer Karim Raslan.\r\n\r\nStill, the shake-up at Pertamina has put other state firms on notice. Together they comprise about 30 percent of Indonesia''s economy, and most are barely growing. (The military also owns several businesses, which it''s in the process of selling.) While there isn''t a consensus for privatization, Yudhoyono insists that state enterprises must become more profitable—even if that means entering into joint ventures controlled by foreigners. Pertamina, for example, holds vast oil and gas fields but lacks the money and expertise to exploit them. ”To be frank, the business environment in Indonesia is not healthy yet,“ says Yudhoyono.\r\n\r\nThe Cepu joint venture had gotten snagged on Pertamina''s demand that control of day-to-day operations should alternate between the partners on a five-year cycle, with Pertamina taking the first shift. Yet Pertamina has never independently operated a field that produced more than 12,000 barrels a day—a small fraction of the size of Cepu. The suspicion among analysts and the media is that Pertamina wanted the first five-year shift so it could dole out the millions of dollars in onshore subcontracts that Cepu will generate. The Jakarta Post said in an editorial last week that Pertamina is ”perceived to be corruption infested… highly vulnerable to vested political interests.“ By taking on these interests, Yudhoyono has signaled that state industries will be held to a higher standard in the future. ”We are really serious about improving performance,“ says Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati.\r\n\r\nFor all the signs of change, there is still something fundamentally troubling about Indonesia''s story. Yes, the country has the most abundant natural resources in Asia, a market of 220 million people, agricultural potential that could one day rival regional leader Thailand and a long history of light manufacturing that could make it a booming export base. Yet no one sector seems big enough to power Indonesia into prosperity. Big oil deals are promising, but oilfields don''t produce nearly as many jobs per dollar invested as manufacturing plants or information services. The disadvantage Indonesia faces in competition with India and China comes down to this question, says the Western diplomat: ”Can Yudhoyono build a winning team without a superstar?" The Indonesian leader has found the starting line. But this race is a marathon. \r\n\r\nhttp://msnbc.msn.com/id/11569226/site/newsweek/
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Indonesia to Sell Dollar Bonds Maturing in 2017, 2035 March 1 (Bloomberg) – Indonesia is selling more of its dollar-denominated bonds due in 2035, betting that improving government finances and the prospect of higher debt ratings will lure investors to its third overseas debt offering within a year. Southeast Asia''s largest economy is also selling bonds due in 2017, an e-mail sent to investors by one of the sale''s underwriters said. A reduction in fuel subsidies and higher interest rates have restored investor confidence in the government''s ability to stick to its budget targets and boosted the local currency, which slumped to a four-year low in August amid concern over surging oil prices. That may help Indonesia win a rating upgrade. ``We are definitely looking at it, like we participated in the earlier bond sale by Indonesia,'''' said Desmond Soon, who may add the securities due in 2017 to the $200 million of debt he manages at Pacific Asset Management in Singapore. ``There is going to be a rating upgrade, which is positive.'''' Moody''s Investors Service said on Feb. 27 it may raise Indonesia''s B2 foreign-currency rating, five levels below investment grade. Higher ratings, which signal a lower risk of debt default, help reduce Indonesia''s borrowing costs. Standard & Poor''s on Feb. 9 raised its outlook on Indonesia''s B+ rating to ``positive'''' from ``stable'''', signaling that it is inclined to boost its credit assessment of the nation. The rating, which S&P raised four times since September 2002, is four levels lower than investment grade and one step lower than the Philippines'' BB- rating. Yields Indonesia''s government is seeking to sell the bonds due in 2017 at a yield between 7 percent and 7.125 percent, the e-mail said. Indonesia''s bonds due in January 2016 were bid yielding 6.88 percent as of 10:18 a.m. in Singapore, according to data provided by Deutsche Bank AG. The government plans to price the bonds due in 2035 at a yield between 7.375 percent and 7.5 percent, the e-mail said. The bonds, which were first sold in October, were bid yielding 7.33 percent, according to Deutsche Bank data. The yield has fallen since Oct. 5, when the securities were priced at 8.625 percent. Indonesia, which has been running a budget deficit since the Asian financial crisis of 1998, needs the support of bond investors to fund its revenue shortfall. The budget deficit may rise to as much as 1.1 percent of gross domestic product in 2006 as the government boosts spending on projects to build roads, ports and utilities, Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said on Jan. 11. The government plans to sell a total of $2 billion in dollar-denominated bonds in 2006. Indonesia raised $2.5 billion from two overseas debt sales in 2005. Rupiah The rupiah has gained about 7 percent this year, making it the world''s second-best performing currency. Six interest-rate increases since July helped the rupiah recover from a four-year low in August and ease inflation from a six-year high of 18.4 percent in November. The rupiah rose 0.2 percent to 9,169 against the U.S. dollar as of 9:35 a.m. in Jakarta. “The situation in Indonesia has stabilized,'''' said Anton Hauser, who holds the nation''s bonds among the 1.3 billion euros ($1.5 billion) of emerging market debt he helps manage at Vienna-based Erste Sparinvest KAG. ”Indonesia will be quite well received by the market.'''' The benchmark Jakarta Composite Index rose to a record 1,261.28 on Jan. 11. Indonesia''s economy is forecast to expand 6.2 percent this year, from 5.6 percent in 2005. Indonesia''s bonds were the second-best performer among Asian government debt last year after the Philippines, handing investors a return of 8.17 percent, according to J.P. Morgan & Chase indexes. "The last time we bought these bonds, they''ve been quite a positive exposure,'''' said Pacific Asset Management''s Soon. Demand Indonesia is tapping demand for developing nation debt as investors seek higher yields, Soon said. The Philippine government sold a record $2.1 billion of bonds in dollars and euros on Jan. 4. Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati and Indonesia''s central bank deputy governor, Hartadi Sarwono, are leading a team of officials in briefing investors on the nation''s economy and finances, according to an invitation sent to investors, a copy of which was given to Bloomberg News last week. The government was to promote the sale to investors in Hong Kong, Singapore and London, and conclude presentations in New York today, three people involved in the sale said on Feb. 23, asking not to be identified before the terms of the offering are set. Barclays Capital, JPMorgan Chase & Co. and UBS AG are arranging the sale. "Definitely we will participate'''' in the bond sale, said Erste Sparinvest''s Hauser. ``We like Indonesia from the macro perspective.'''' http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000080&sid=aZPnPLeHToiY&refer=asia
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Indonesia Government Unveils Investment Stimulus Package Kamis, 2 Maret 2006 20:55:55 JAKARTA (Dow Jones)–Indonesia''s government unveiled a package of investment stimulus measures aimed at helping accelerate on-year economic growth to above 6.0% in 2006, a senior economics ministry official said late Thursday. The package consists of 85 measures designed to remove regulatory obstacles to investment in areas including taxation, customs and excise, labor and small-medium enterprise development, Deputy Coordinating Minister for the Economy, Jannes Hutagalung, told reporters at a press briefing. “With the implementation of this package, we expect our economy can expand by over 6.0% this year,” Hutagalung said. “This is something we have to do in order to improve the investment environment.” Indonesia recorded annual economic growth of 5.6% in 2005, below an official projection of 6.0%, but outpacing the 5.4% expansion recorded in 2004. The government of President Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono has said it requires $150 billion in infrastructure investment alone during the next four years to help deliver an official target of 6.6% average annual economic growth from 2004 to 2009. Indonesia will likely record a 21% rise in actual foreign and domestic investment to IDR139 trillion for 2006, the head of the official Investment Coordinating Board said last month. But analysts say the government''s failure to address concerns about the country''s regulatory environment, rampant corruption and perceptions of an unpredictable judiciary continue to stifle investment inflows. Measures to make Indonesia more investment-friendly include a reduction in new business license issuance time to roughly 30 days from a current average of 150 days, Hutagalung said. A World Bank survey issued last year highlighted that lengthy wait as typical of the chronic bureaucratic indolence crippling Indonesia''s capacity to compete with its neighbors as a foreign investment destination. Hutagalung said the government will also cut the business income taxation rate to 28% in 2007 and then to 25% by 2010 from a current level of 30%. But the bulk of the package consist of timetables for the next year to draft or revise regulations the Indonesian government views as critical to accelerating investment rather than specific stimulus measures. While the government has prioritized the settlement of various industrial relations disputes “quickly, cheaply and fairly,” the document unveiled Thursday doesn''t outline mechanisms for doing so. But the long-awaited investment stimulus package will likely come as a relief to investors who''ve put their faith in Coordinating Minister for the Economy Boediono in rejuvenating the country''s investment environment. Boediono joined President Yudhoyono''s economic cabinet in December. Boediono, who served as finance minister under Yudhoyono''s predecessor, Megawati Sukarnoputri, earned a reputation as a financial rainmaker by piloting Indonesia''s departure from an International Monetary Fund emergency borrowing program at the end of 2003.
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Bung Imam Semar, berbicara mengenai pemerintah akan mencetak uang lagi… Dari data Bung IS yang ada, memangnya sekarang jumlah uang beredar yang ada di Indonesia berapa banyak Rupiah??? Kalau semakin banyak uang rupiah yang beredar, kenapa rupiah menguat terus??? Terima Kasih Infonya
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